Could it be that children are notoriously fussy eaters due to an evolutionary instinct warning them to avoid unfamiliar foods in case they are dangerous?

Depending on which expert you listen to, it is not your fault you don't like Brussels sprouts, boiled cabbage or chocolate.

Before you reached adulthood, it's likely that you had at least one food which made you squirm. You may have even felt queasy at the sight of it.

However, Dr Lucy Cooke of University College London will tell you a whopping 78% of children inherit a fear of eating unknown foods from their parents.

It's called neophobia.

I read this and had a momentary sense of relief I was not responsible for my distaste of mini round smelly green veg. Laying blame on my parents is so much easier and far less stressful.

One must then conclude that I am merely a descendent of Brussels sprouts hating generations since the dawning of time. Again, I was SO relieved.

That is, until I realised my parents and three of my four siblings hang out for winter and Brussels sprouts season.

Back to google and the learned Yale psychologist, Linda Bartoshuk, who has discovered that some humans are "supertasters".

Aha. We "supertasters" have more taste buds than other mere mortals meaning we taste flavours more intensely. I have won the genetic lottery of an elite race of beings whose claim to fame is in our mouths.

If only my genetic composition gave me the power to cure cancer, solve world peace and work out how to feed fussy eating children.

Like a good recipe, it sometimes takes many ingredients to raise a child well. Patience, experimentation, perseverance, common sense and healthy dose of humour. Nothing too exotic but everything straightforward and loving.

And when Brussels sprouts don't rock your child's boat, try something else green (or red, purple or any other colour for that matter) from mother nature's basket of goodies.